• November 27Need money for college? See Ms. Bowers in the College and Career Center for a list of available scholarships.

  • November 27Yearbook questions? See Ms. Silverman or a yearbook rep in D3!

A Day in the Life of a Short Person

Life is pretty different when you’re short

Shayne Harms, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






There are so many struggles when it comes to being short. However, there are also benefits.

“I love being short,” Gunderson freshman, Angelina Gulizia said, “It helps with gymnastics.” I am four foot ten, and a cheerleader, I completely relate with Angelina.

On a typical day, I wake up, I put on my clothes (which are still mostly kids sizes, may I add) and head off to school. Everyday, there are people who will put their arm on my shoulder, or head if they’re tall enough. Then, there are the people who lower themselves to be your height. Sometimes, they might decide to be even taller than they actually are just to annoy you.

Usually there is some sort of school activity, which involves a crowd, which involves one of two things. Either, my friends push me to the front of the crowd and draw attention to it, or some tall person goes in front of you and you end up not seeing anything. Oh, and don’t get me started on rallies.

Rally days are fun, but I’m usually the person who gets shoved down onto the stairs, “because your butt fits there” as most people say when arguing why I should. When the rally is over you are stuck in a sea of tall people all moving in one direction.

After school, I typically go to the public library to read and do homework. One time, I couldn’t reach The Fault in Our Stars, so I had to ask a sixth grader to reach it for me.

It’s not a problem that I face alone, “I can’t really reach for high objects,” Maryjane Dominguez, freshman at Gunderson said. “I really don’t like being short.”

Then I go to my little sister’s cheerleading practice. Where I end up being the same height, or shorter than most of the girl’s on the team. That sucks because no one really listens to you when you’re smaller than them, even in cheerleading.

However, there are many benefits to being short, for example fitting through small spaces.

“I can fit through a lot of small things,” Gunderson sophomore Joshua Garcia said. I totally agree with him— I mean that can be really helpful. Especially, when you’re running from someone.

It also helps with performance sports, such as cheerleading, gymnastics, and dance. I can speak from experience that, when you’re short in cheerleading, it helps with stunting because you’re closer to the ground than you would’ve been if you were tall. You also are more compact so you twist easier.

It helps to be short when moving through the hallways because you just kind of brush past people. Which, in turn brings me to class quicker. At Gunderson I have never been late for a class. Partially in thanks to my height. I also don’t have to think as much about being on the right side of the hallway all the time.

I can also get to my locker easier. I have a bottom locker in the forum. I think a lot of people can agree bottom lockers are pretty bad. However, since I’m short I have less distance to bend down and reach.

I think that so many people look over the benefits of being short. All because people typically aren’t intimidated by people who are shorter or smaller than them. Even short people don’t pay attention to the benefits of their height because people look at what they don’t have instead of trying to get better with what they do have. They just focus on the negative parts of their height, and they don’t care about the fact that their height can be an advantage.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
The Student News Site of Gunderson High School
A Day in the Life of a Short Person