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Slang around the school

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Students square off

Students square off

Julian Simpson

Julian Simpson

Students square off

Julian Simpson, Editor

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[God]Damn. [Son of a]B*tch. Motherf*cker. F*ck [off]. N*gga.

People have a tendency to talk like this–it may not be the most flattering or it might be a vulgar way to talk, but these words still sometimes creep out of our mouths.

Preteens, teenagers, young adults, adults, even children seem to know some of these profane words now! There are so many other possible clean ways to describe or emphasize what you’re trying to say. Really, is the other way the better way to express our feelings? Why do we use those words anyways?

We students use these words everyday, throughout the day, in the halls, to our friends, and even in class.  Even the best of us, those who many would be very surprised to hear curse, still do.

“They are all taken back, they are all shocked, they think I never curse — I kind of have that reputation not to curse,” junior Harsimran Sandhu said.

Sandhu, Gunderson’s ASB Vice President, Key Club President and practically straight A student, describes cursing as being very common for high school students.

It is really common. You hear it everywhere now, in every place now. I actually don’t know why. It’s, like, very normal when you get to high school.”

— Harsimran Sandhu

A Gallup Youth Survey from 2001 shows that teens from ages 13 to 17 speak words of profanity at least several times a day. But, to students, what is really considered a curse word?

“Damn, if that counts. I don’t know, it is the most that comes in situations for me, when I’m like ahhh… dammit,” Sandhu said.

Now we students use dirty words all the time, but believe it or not, when it comes to cursing teachers are human as well. When that teacher sees us students messing around or doing notoriously stupid things, they might feel the need to curse, too.  However, teachers have to set a good example for their students.

“[I]try not to use it at all in front of students as it’s unprofessional.  When I have used it, people [students] generally know I’m trying to regain their attention,” PE teacher Chuck Ball said.

Ball also coaches the varsity football team, and on the field the anxiety of the game can get to him.

“If you’re asking what influences me when I choose to use curse words, the answer is pure frustration. But even in that setting, I have tried to minimize my use of curse words. [I]just feel there are better ways to express my frustration,” Ball said.

Asking all my sources the questions, the weirdest part is none them took a clear stance on whether cursing was affected by your literacy level. Also how cursing correlates with your literacy level.

In a study from Piercarlo Valdesolo, an Assistant Professor of Psychology, tested the theory: “Theses Results from Study 1 showed that participants generated 400 unique taboo words as the researchers predicted, fluency in generating these words correlated positively with performance on the COWAT (Controlled Word Association Test). The more taboo words participants could generate, the more verbally fluent they were in general.”

The main populous of people who were asked why they curse, had three reasons. First, out of anger or frustration, secondly to emphasize or get somebody’s attention and lastly, just because. So next time you curse just think to yourself and stop and think why us students, humans, anyone why do we curse?

About the Writer
Julian Simpson, Editor in Chief
Julian Simpson is one of three editors in our Gunderson High School journalism class and news provider, The Paw Print. Currently and Junior this is his second year on staff and he also does other extracurricular activities such as sports for the school and currently Assistant Editor-In-Chief in Yearbook. His hobbies are to watch and...
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